Category Archives: Dementia

What was it I came up here for?

Many of us have those moments where you walk upstairs to get something, get to the landing and have no idea what it was you went upstairs for! We put the kettle on, get our favourite mug out ready for a nice cup of tea, only to come back into the kitchen an hour later with the tea still unmade. Someone gives us directions and within seconds we can’t remember whether it is left or right at the post box.

The causes of forgetfulness are numerous. They run from being overwhelmed with responsibility and demands to not paying close enough attention – we simply didn’t “hear” the instructions in the first place. Other times we are so distracted by everything that is going on around us that we are on overload and have too much to remember and can’t. But when should we worry that it is becoming more serious?

Forgetfulness results from changes in the brain and can be a normal part of aging or a symptom of another condition or disease. When you experience forgetfulness, you may find it harder to recall information or events, learn new things, or form new memories. As people get older, changes occur in all parts of the body, including the brain. As a result, some people may notice that it takes longer to learn new things, they don’t remember information as well as they did, or they lose things like their glasses. These usually are signs of mild forgetfulness, not serious memory problems. Abnormal forgetfulness isn’t only about failing to remember; it’s more complex than that.

Be concerned when you see a pattern of deteriorating functioning, not just correctable incidents of forgetting. Loss of previous abilities or negative changes in long-established, characteristic behaviour and personality patterns indicates a need to seek help. Understanding normal forgetfulness can help us adjust more gracefully to the challenges of healthy aging. We need to give ourselves and our loved ones more time to recall events, names, and words as we age, because “normal” recall can take longer. Knowing that can help us plan to build in extra time for certain events or tasks.

http://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/forgetfulness

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/Memory-Loss-and-Dementia

http://www.ehow.com/about_5137621_causes-forgetfulness.html#ixzz32X7tjZtD

http://psychcentral.com/lib/when-to-worry-about-forgetfulness/00013100

Mr-Forgetful

NHS England News: Dementia Announcement

By on 03 02, 2015 in communityDementia

 

We share a news article from NHS England: Original Article

A new vision for dementia, announcement by the Prime Minister, has been welcomed by NHS England’s Clinical Director for Dementia Professor Alistair Burns.

On Saturday 21st February, David Cameron announced the next phase of the government’s “challenge on dementia” programme.

He pledged £300m of investment into dementia research over the next parliament, a new global fund on dementia, one million NHS staff to be trained in dementia, and faster assessments, better care for all. Nationally, initial dementia assessments will take place in an average of six weeks, followed by better support post-diagnosis.

Professor Burns said: “Awareness of dementia is at its highest level and to have 1 million Dementia Friends shows the enormous strides we have taken in the last three years.

“We are beginning to change the way society respects and treats people with dementia. We can change the lives of tens of thousands of people for the better if we can continue to raise awareness, invest in the search for new treatments, and most importantly improve the lives of people with dementia and their carers.”

The number of people being diagnosed with dementia has been steadily rising and as of January an estimated 398,597 people had been added to the dementia register, up from 250,000 in 2009.

Since March the numbers have jumped from 349,000 with between 5,000 and an extra 10,000 people a month now being added to the dementia register.

Announcing the dementia vision, Prime Minister David Cameron, said: “Dementia is one of the greatest challenges of our lifetime, and I am proud that we are leading the world in fighting it.

“Because of the growing strength of our economy, we can invest in research and drug-development, as well as public understanding, so we defeat this terrible condition and offer more hope and dignity for those who suffer.

“That way, we can help make Britain a country that offers security in retirement for all.”

He also announced the creation of a new global fund on dementia, which would see investors from the public and private sectors unite to fund a range of research projects.

NHS England News: Dementia Announcement

By Steve McNulty on 03 02, 2015 in communityDementia

  We share a news article from NHS England: Original Article A new vision for dementia, announcement by the Prime Minister, has been welcomed by NHS England’s Clinical Director for Dementia Professor Alistair Burns. On Saturday 21st February, David Cameron announced the next phase of the government’s “challenge on dementia” programme. He pledged £300m of investment [...]


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